1. Nicely Said: Writing for the Web with Style and Purpose 
Nicole Fenton & Kate Kiefer Lee
Reading, rereading, and referencing since June 12…

    Nicely Said: Writing for the Web with Style and Purpose 

    Nicole Fenton & Kate Kiefer Lee

    Reading, rereading, and referencing since June 12…

  2. Forgotten Queens 
Kevin Walsh
bedside shortstack.

    Forgotten Queens 

    Kevin Walsh

    bedside shortstack.

  3. Please Understand Me: Character and Temperament Types
David Keirsey
INFJ (Introversion-Intuition-Feeling-Judging) - “The Author”
The Apollonian Temperament 

Becoming a Person means that the individual moves toward being, knowingly and acceptingly, the process which he inwardly and actually is. He moves away from being what he is not, from being a facade. He is not trying to be more than he is, with the  attendant feelings of insecurity or bombastic defensiveness. He is not trying to be less than he is, with the attendant feelings of guilt or self-deprication. He is increasingly listening to the deepest recesses of his psychological and emotional being, and finds himself increasingly willing to be, with greater accuracy and depth, that self which he most truly is. 
[Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1961, p. 176]

Although this passage is seen by other styles as at best speaking in riddles, and at worst sheer nonsense, that same passage is revered by the NF as elegantly expressing the Apollonean way—the search for Self. (58)
It’s coming full circle: The NF’s ‘truest’ self is the self in search of itself, or in other words, his purpose in life is to have a purpose in life. Always becoming himself, the NF can never truly be himself, since the very act of reaching for the self immediately puts it out of reach. (58-59) E.g. Hamlet’s “to be or not to be” soliloquy.
So this is why:This paradox is the NFs burden throughout life, and his job, quite apart from his goal, is to resolve the paradox. Most do, some do not. The ones that do are happy and productive; the ones that do not suffer. […] He hungers for self-actualization, to be and to become real. To be what he is meant to be and to have an identity which is uniquely his. His endless search for self  most often causes him guilt, believing that his real self is somehow less than it ought to be. And so he wanders, sometimes spiritually, sometimes psychologically, sometimes physically, seeking to satisfy his hunger for unity and uniqueness, to become self-actualized into a perfect whole and to have an identity which is perfectly unique, even though the paths in search of self are never clearly marked. (59)
No matter how the NF structures his time and relationships, he needs to have meaning. (60)
Self-realization for the NF means to have integrity, that is, unity. There must be no facade, no mask, no pretense, no sham, no playing of roles. To have integrity is to be genuine, to communicate authentically, to be in harmony with the inner experiences of self. (60)
NFs are extremely sensitive to subtleties in gestures and metaphoric behavior not always visible to other types. (60)
As NFs well know, the pen is mightier than the sword. (61)
The NF thinks about the possibilities in people. (65)
In Apollo the NFs find their prototype. Their hunger is not centered on things but people. They are not content with abstractions; they seek relationships. Their need does not ground to action; it vibrates with interaction. (66)
***
Portrait of an INFJ
INFJs are usually good students, achievers who exhibit an unostentatious creativity. They take their work seriously and enjoy academic activity. They can exhibit qualities of overperfectionism and put more into a task than perhaps is justified by the nature of the task. They generally will not be visible leaders, but will quietly exert influence behind the scenes. (170)
INFJs have vivid imaginations exercised both as memory and intuition. (171)
"mystical" (171)
The INFJ is the most poetic of all types. (171)
!:INFJs may be attracted to writing as a profession, and often they use language which contains an unusual degree of imagery. […] Their great talent for language usually is directed toward people, describing people and writing to communicate with people in a personalized way. INFJs who write comment often that they write with a particular person in mind; writing to a faceless, abstract audience leaves them uninspired. (171)
If they are subject to a hostile, unfriendly working condition or to constant criticism, they tend to lose confidence, become unhappy and immobilized, and finally become physically ill. (172)

    Please Understand Me: Character and Temperament Types

    David Keirsey

    INFJ (Introversion-Intuition-Feeling-Judging) - “The Author”

    The Apollonian Temperament 

    Becoming a Person means that the individual moves toward being, knowingly and acceptingly, the process which he inwardly and actually is. He moves away from being what he is not, from being a facade. He is not trying to be more than he is, with the  attendant feelings of insecurity or bombastic defensiveness. He is not trying to be less than he is, with the attendant feelings of guilt or self-deprication. He is increasingly listening to the deepest recesses of his psychological and emotional being, and finds himself increasingly willing to be, with greater accuracy and depth, that self which he most truly is. 

    [Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1961, p. 176]

    Although this passage is seen by other styles as at best speaking in riddles, and at worst sheer nonsense, that same passage is revered by the NF as elegantly expressing the Apollonean way—the search for Self. (58)

    It’s coming full circle:
    The NF’s ‘truest’ self is the self in search of itself, or in other words, his purpose in life is to have a purpose in life. Always becoming himself, the NF can never truly be himself, since the very act of reaching for the self immediately puts it out of reach. (58-59)

    E.g. Hamlet’s “to be or not to be” soliloquy.

    So this is why:
    This paradox is the NFs burden throughout life, and his job, quite apart from his goal, is to resolve the paradox. Most do, some do not. The ones that do are happy and productive; the ones that do not suffer. […] He hungers for self-actualization, to be and to become real. To be what he is meant to be and to have an identity which is uniquely his. His endless search for self  most often causes him guilt, believing that his real self is somehow less than it ought to be. And so he wanders, sometimes spiritually, sometimes psychologically, sometimes physically, seeking to satisfy his hunger for unity and uniqueness, to become self-actualized into a perfect whole and to have an identity which is perfectly unique, even though the paths in search of self are never clearly marked. (59)

    No matter how the NF structures his time and relationships, he needs to have meaning. (60)

    Self-realization for the NF means to have integrity, that is, unity. There must be no facade, no mask, no pretense, no sham, no playing of roles. To have integrity is to be genuine, to communicate authentically, to be in harmony with the inner experiences of self. (60)

    NFs are extremely sensitive to subtleties in gestures and metaphoric behavior not always visible to other types. (60)

    As NFs well know, the pen is mightier than the sword. (61)

    The NF thinks about the possibilities in people. (65)

    In Apollo the NFs find their prototype. Their hunger is not centered on things but people. They are not content with abstractions; they seek relationships. Their need does not ground to action; it vibrates with interaction. (66)

    ***

    Portrait of an INFJ

    INFJs are usually good students, achievers who exhibit an unostentatious creativity. They take their work seriously and enjoy academic activity. They can exhibit qualities of overperfectionism and put more into a task than perhaps is justified by the nature of the task. They generally will not be visible leaders, but will quietly exert influence behind the scenes. (170)

    INFJs have vivid imaginations exercised both as memory and intuition. (171)

    "mystical" (171)

    The INFJ is the most poetic of all types. (171)

    !:
    INFJs may be attracted to writing as a profession, and often they use language which contains an unusual degree of imagery. […] Their great talent for language usually is directed toward people, describing people and writing to communicate with people in a personalized way. INFJs who write comment often that they write with a particular person in mind; writing to a faceless, abstract audience leaves them uninspired. (171)

    If they are subject to a hostile, unfriendly working condition or to constant criticism, they tend to lose confidence, become unhappy and immobilized, and finally become physically ill. (172)

  4. Sula
Toni Morrison
need to reread.

    Sula

    Toni Morrison

    need to reread.

  5. White Girls
Hilton Als
December 22, 2013: reading…

    White Girls

    Hilton Als

    December 22, 2013: reading…

  6. Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer

Peter Turchi

to-read.

    Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer

    Peter Turchi

    to-read.

  7. The Best of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Chris Monks, John Warner (Editors)

reading sporadically.

    The Best of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

    Chris Monks, John Warner (Editors)

    reading sporadically.

  8. Several Short Sentences About Writing
Verlyn Klinkenborg
to-read pile via nicolefenton.com/build-2013

    Several Short Sentences About Writing

    Verlyn Klinkenborg

    to-read pile via nicolefenton.com/build-2013

  9. Revenge of the Lawn, The Abortion, So the Wind Won’t Blow It All Away

Richard Brautigan

to-read pile.

    Revenge of the Lawn, The Abortion, So the Wind Won’t Blow It All Away

    Richard Brautigan

    to-read pile.

  10. The Circle
Dave Eggers
October 13, 2013. 
marginal notes and underlines to come.

    The Circle

    Dave Eggers

    October 13, 2013. 

    marginal notes and underlines to come.

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